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Journal of No. 118


December 27th, 2009

Cue lame jokes and flames! @ 08:59 am

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Sex differences in parking are affected by biological and social factors

"We show that men park more accurately and especially faster than women. Performance is related to mental rotation skills and self-assessment in beginners, but only to self-assessment in more experienced drivers. We assume that, due to differential feedback, self-assessment incrementally replaces the controlling influence of mental rotation, as parking is trained with increasing experience."

OK, Poindexter, but that science gobbledygook isn't very interesting. Let's get a reaction from Germaine Greer:

"You must remember that women also have bosoms which makes it very difficult to turn around."

Vive la différence!
 
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From:my_wits_end
Date:December 27th, 2009 06:19 pm (UTC)
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Right, I'll be sure to remember this study next time I'm self-assessing my parking.
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From:ian_tiberius
Date:December 27th, 2009 07:01 pm (UTC)
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From the Daily Mail article: "...the biggest difference was in parallel parking, where men were found to be five per cent better in their handling and positioning of the vehicle."

If the largest difference they found between the genders was 5%, and they have a sample size of only thirty women and thirty-five men, then their most significant finding is less than half the margin of error, based on sample size alone never mind any selection bias. How did this horseshit get published?
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From:essentialsaltes
Date:December 27th, 2009 07:55 pm (UTC)
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When I saw the Daily Mail article I didn't have high hopes that it was reported accurately or that the 'experiment' was much more than the effort of a couple bored grad students and their friends, so I too was surprised to find the published journal article. It would be interesting to see the whole thing to see how (or if) they evaluated the significance of the findings.

Journal of No. 118